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  1. Hi my name is Arnold Cole and I am an editorial researcher for Our Weekly newspaper, we are currently doing a cover story on the Afro Hairstyle and were attempting to get information on Afro combs , similar to the Ashanti comb or any hand carved afro pick, when were they first seen by western civilization , the majority of combs I have viewed on internet appear to be recent carvings. Could you assist me in this matter.

    1. http://www.creative-museum.com/en/content/facing-me-facing-you
      http://www.creative-museum.com/en/geo/afrique
      http://barbaraanneshaircombblog.com/2011/11/29/creative-museum-fulani-hair-ornaments-and-jewelry/
      http://barbaraanneshaircombblog.com/2011/12/06/creative-museum-tuareg-jewelry-worn-by-a-wodaabe-woman/
      http://barbaraanneshaircombblog.com/images/feb2012/ArtPrimitifAfricainAgalom-blackpowercombs.jpg

      An article by Jen Cruse, author of The Comb: Its History and Development, in the Antique Comb Collectors Club newsletter — I can get this for you with permission, but I am also going to write one of my own. Jen’s book and other books can be bought at Amazon.com via the blog’s Resource Library: http://barbaraanneshaircombblog.com/hair-comb-and-jewelry-resource-library/

      The story of African combs and their reappearance in American culture after slavery is the same as music, dance, and every other art form. Slavery took away everything — people’s names, tribal identities, languages, music, poetry, art, everything. As you will see in The Creative Museum’s presentation on African combs, they were devoted to ancestor worship, fertility, and many other themes. Today you see pick combs in Wal-Mart with nothing on the handle, and this to me, signifies the death of culture. However, during the black power movement, a designer put a black power fist on the handle. The African cultural idea of comb design had not died.

      The black power afro picture copyright belongs to Art Primitif Africain Agalom, an African art dealer in France. The Creative Museum photos’ copyright belongs to them. You would need permission to use them in your article. I am friends with everyone on FB. If you would like to contact them, or any of my authors for more information, please let me know and I will ask them if I can give them your email address. Their information might not be free, just so you will be prepared for what they will charge. I hope this helps.

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